How Teachers Can Assume Agency in the Feedback Process

As a teacher, you are constantly being evaluated on your performance. Your evaluations may come in the form of formal observations from your principal or instructional coach, or they may be more informal, such as conversations with colleagues or student feedback. It can be easy to feel like you are constantly being critiqued, but it is important to remember that you have agency in the feedback process. You can choose how to receive and implement feedback to improve your teaching practice.

Blog Introduction: As a teacher, you are constantly being evaluated on your performance. Your evaluations may come in the form of formal observations from your principal or instructional coach, or they may be more informal, such as conversations with colleagues or feedback from students. It can be easy to feel like you are constantly being critiqued, but it is important to remember that you have agency in the feedback process. You can choose how to receive and implement feedback in order to improve your teaching practice.

Here are some tips for how teachers can assume agency in the feedback process:

  1. Be proactive in seeking out feedback. Don’t wait for someone to come to you with criticism; instead, ask for constructive criticism from your colleagues and supervisors. This will show that you are open to receiving feedback and that you value it as a tool for growth.
  2. Be an active listener when you do receive feedback. Really listen to what the person is saying and try to understand their perspective. Then, take some time to reflect on the feedback before responding.
  3. Use your feedback as a starting point for further reflection and inquiry. Once you have processed the initial criticism, ask yourself questions such as “What can I do differently next time?” or “How can I implement this suggestion in my classroom?” By approaching feedback with a growth mindset, you will be able to use it to improve your practice.
  4. Communicate with your supervisor about how you would like to receive feedback. Perhaps there is a specific type of feedback that would be most helpful for you, or maybe there is a certain time of day when you would prefer to have coaching conversations. By communicating your needs, you can ensure that the feedback process is beneficial for both you and your supervisor.
    5.$ Seek out multiple sources of feedback. In addition to formal evaluations, look for opportunities for informal feedback from students, colleagues, and even parents. This type of ongoing feedback can be invaluable in helping you adjust your instruction on the fly and make necessary changes throughout the year.

  5. Receiving constructive feedback is an important part of being a teacher. However, it is also important to remember that you have agency in the process; you can choose how to receive and respond to criticism to use it as a tool for growth. When approached with a positive attitude and an open mind, feedback can be a powerful tool for teachers to improve their practice.

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