The Difference Between Observation Notes, Rationale, and Feedback

When providing written feedback to educators, it’s important to understand the difference between observation notes, rationale, and feedback. All three are important, but they serve different purposes. Here’s a quick breakdown of each:

Observation Notes: These are just the facts. Who did what, when, and where. Think of them as a “this is what I saw” narrative.

Rationale: This is your interpretation of the facts. Why do you think the person did what they did? What was their motivation? What were the results of their actions?

Feedback: This is what you say to the person based on your interpretation of the facts. It’s important to remember that feedback should always be constructive. You’re trying to help the person improve, not tear them down.

The Importance of Written Feedback

Written feedback is important because it records what was said and how the conversation went. It also allows you to step back and look at the situation objectively. When you’re in the moment, it’s easy to get caught up in emotions and miss important details. But when you have written feedback, you can take your time and really think about what was said and what could have been said better.

That’s why it’s so important to understand the difference between observation notes, rationale, and feedback. All three are important pieces of the puzzle, but each serves a different purpose. By understanding the role each plays, you can provide more effective written feedback that will help educators improve their practice.

When it comes to providing written feedback to educators, it’s important to understand the difference between observation notes, rationale, and feedback. All three are important, but they serve different purposes. Observation notes are just the facts; they’re a “this is what I saw” narrative. The rationale is your interpretation of the facts; it’s why you think the person did what they did and what was their motivation. Feedback is what you say to the person based on your interpretation of the facts; it should always be constructive and meant to help improve their practice. Written feedback is important because it provides a record of what was said and how the conversation went; it allows you to step back and look at the situation objectively. So next time you’re providing written feedback to an educator, keep these three things in mind!

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